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Thursday, 17 June 2021

The Abolition of Canada

 by Riley Donovan


The ethnocide of EuroCanadians in a single picture

Every record has been destroyed or falsified, every book has been rewritten, every picture has been repainted, every statue and street building has been renamed, every date has been altered…History has stopped. Nothing exists except the endless present in which the party is always right. --- George Orwell, 1984

Reckoning with the past and attempting to treat the weaker and suffering members of society is a unique, and I think laudable, attribute of Western civilization. In Canada, thinking about our historical conduct as a nation and attempting to treat all citizens with dignity in the present has turned into a ritualistic sacrifice of our culture in a vain attempt to assuage the feelings of white guilt taught to us by our government and media.

This dark self-sacrificial rite will result in the abolition of the Canada of my youth, the nation I love with all my heart and soul, my homeland. Not content with simply watching the renaming of schools and streets and the effectively state sanctioned vandalism of great monuments, I have attempted to catalogue all of the acts of cultural destruction that have been perpetrated against Anglo and French culture in the past weeks.

I hope there is some value to be gained in a list of this sort. May the names and monuments that have been destroyed not be forgotten. May they rise again in more rural landscapes as European Canadians flee the diversified cities and re-establish themselves in the countryside.
  • The Ryerson Journalism department renamed two of its publications, the Ryerson Review of Journalism magazine and the Ryersonian newspaper, previously bearing the name of Egerton Ryerson (1803-1882).
  • A statue of Egerton Ryerson on the Ryerson university campus was doused with red paint. The wall behind it was covered with graffiti, some of which told white Canadians to “go back to where you came from” and declared that the activists “hate all colonizers”. There were no arrests.
  • A petition on change.org was started by Maaz Khan calling for the statue of Egerton Ryerson to be removed. At the time of publication the petition had 10,158 signatures.
  • The City Council of Charlottetown voted unanimously to remove the statue of John A. Macdonald. It was removed at 6:30 in the morning of June 1st. All that remains is a plaque and a concrete pad with some red paint still on it from when the statue was last vandalized (no arrests were made for the vandalism).

No arrests were made for the vandalism of the Ryerson statue

  • Cam Galindo, a trustee for Hamilton’s school board, is calling for Ryerson Elementary school to be renamed and has filed a motion to formally reconsider the names of all schools named after historic Canadians. Galindo declared that “all school names must reflect human rights, decolonization, anti-racism and anti-oppression principles”.
  • Global News has reported that there are calls for all schools in Ontario named after Egerton Ryerson to be renamed.
  • The Yellowhead institute, an aboriginal think tank at Ryerson University, has begun to use the name ‘University X’ as a protest to remove Egerton Ryerson’s name from the university. The Yellowhead institute declared that they are fighting “racist narratives that continue to oppress Black, indigenous, and racialized people generally”.
  • Calgary Mayor Naheed Nenshi called upon the Calgary Board of Education and the Calgary Catholic School District to change the name of Langevin School and Bishop Grandin School.
  • The Calgary Board of Education has renamed Langevin elementary School, named after Hector-Louis Langevin (1826-1906).
  • Edmonton Catholic Schools is reviewing the name of Grandin Catholic Elementary School, named after Bishop Vital-Justin Grandin (1829-1902).
  • Winnipeg Mayor Brian Bowman has decided to rename Bishop Grandin street. He has also created a committee to remove and rename “historical markers and place names” and “resolve the absence of Indigenous perspectives & contributions in the stories remembered/commemorated”.
  • Three Ottawa councillors have called for the renaming of the Sir John A. Macdonald Parkway.
  • Grandin Fish and Chips in Edmonton is being renamed.

Charlottetown John A. Macdonald statue vandalized

  • Edmonton’s Mayor, Don Iveson, has decided to rename Grandin LRT station. A mural of Bishop Grandin within the LRT station will be covered in orange. The new name of the station will have to contribute to “reconciliation”. All civic signs in Edmonton bearing Grandin’s name will also be renamed.
  • Edmonton Mayor Don Iveson has also declared that he is working to rename all place names celebrating past Canadians who “no longer reflect our diverse and inclusive community values”.
  • The City of Edmonton has decided to rename the Oliver neighbourhood, named after Frank Oliver (1853-1933).
  • Trustees at Greater St. Albert Catholic Schools have formed an ad hoc committee to review the names of all schools in the division including Vital Grandin Catholic School.
  • Hamilton Bike Share has removed the name Ryerson from one of its recreation hubs.
  • A portrait and bust of Egerton Ryerson has been removed from outside Ontario NDP leader Andrea Horwath's office at her request. It is now in storage.
  • A school meeting will discuss the potential renaming of Ryerson Public School in London, Ontario.
  • Calls are growing to remove the giant statue of John A. Macdonald statue in City Park, Kingston, Ontario. The Kingston City Council is considering the matter.
  • The University of Windsor has decided to rename the Macdonald Hall student residence.
  • Protestors used a truck and a rope to tear down the Egerton Ryerson statue in Toronto. Protestors then separated the head of the statue and hit it with a mallet. There was no police intervention or arrests. President of Ryerson, Mohamed Lachemi, said the statue would not be put back up.

The head of the Ryerson statue now sits on a spike in the “Land Back Lane” native blockade in Caledonia

  • Newfoundland premier Andrew Furey has decided to change the province’s coat of arms which depicts two Beothuk warriors.
  • Prince Edward County council has voted 13-1 to remove the John A. Macdonald statue from Main Street in Picton, Ontario.
  • Hamilton public board votes to rename Ryerson Elementary School
  • Two sports teams at Ryerson University have removed Ryerson from their names.

The “holding court” John A. statue in Picton is now gone


This list shouldn’t discourage you, but rather encourage you to fight for the culture and heritage of our great country. Being discouraged doesn’t help anyone, especially not your country and your people.

Don’t get me wrong, this list should enrage you. The renaming of buildings, the changing of symbols and the toppling of statues are acts of state sanctioned cultural destruction that sever the sense of historical continuity which is integral to the psychology of the human mind. As our cherished old culture is dismantled piece by piece, the state replaces it with symbols foreign to the continent and to our souls. This is, of course, nothing less than the ethnocide of EuroCanadians

So let yourself be angry, and aggrieved, and hurt, but not depressed. Let your own life become an act of defiance of the globalist system. Read old books, refuse to use politically correct language, raise hell in town hall meetings when discussion turns to removing a statue from the local square or an old novel from the school curriculum. Fight the good fight, and have a little fun doing it - your ancestors are smiling on you.

Let us not become weary in doing good, for at the proper time we will reap a harvest if we do not give up. --- Galatians 6:9

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